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My blog is "The Nicole Factor" on Blogspot, my Facebook page "Nicole Czarnecki aka Nickidewbear", and YouTube and Twitter accounts "Nickidewbear."

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Showing posts with label statuses. Show all posts
Showing posts with label statuses. Show all posts

Tuesday, October 6, 2015

Something To Make Your Own and Share

I saw this on a Facebook friend's status, and I decided to personalize it. This isn't stuff that I haven't talked about in some capacity before, by the way. Incidentally, Great-Granddad Czarnecki could have (if God willed) lived to be 111 this month (October 24th) had he not committed suicide (Trust me; he has a certain cousin whom is 98 and will, if God wills, be 99 this year. He could easily have had that longevity gene, and only God knows if he did.).

Do me a favor, then, and make the following your own in a Facebook status, note, or something:

Depression is real and relentless. I and others have been on that edge, and I myself ended up in Sheppard Pratt over it in April of 2006 (To hide that is useless, especially when why the Depression was exacerbated affected me to threaten myself.). I'm therefore asking everyone to stop hiding their own Depression or whatever mental illness(es) you have (I also have, e.g., OCD, by the way.).

On the other hand, you can continue to hide it as many in my family have hidden it and did hide it—and let's see how well that works for you. Let me give you a hint: it doesn't work—if, for example, my father's paternal grandfather (Anthony Czarnecki, RIP) and maternal great-granduncles Alexander and Frank Fosko (z"l) could come back, they'd tell you.

So would their father, Istvan Foczko (z"l)—he was in his 50s when he died, had six sons and one daughter, and has never had his cause of death mentioned. Statistically, there is no other possibility that he died in any other way than by suicide—whether 29% of a chance (since two of his seven children committed suicide, and if you round the percentage up) or 66% (since two of his six sons committed suicide) the chance is well above 10%, and even 25%. The average of 29 and 66 is 47.5—so, think about that: almost 50% of a chance that he committed suicide, and the other 50-53% (that he didn't commit suicide, and that he even would have lived past his 50s) may well have happened if he had talked about what he endured. 

Meanwhile, I'm asking everyone to copy and paste this status—and personalize it. If only I was sharing a personal struggle with mental illness, it'd be a damned shame. Besides, you don't know whom you might help if you (in the words of my father's paternal grandmother, z"l) "talk about it" (When she broke down and told my aunt about many things before she died, those were her exact words after 90-plus years of life—"No; no, it's okay: I want to talk about it."). ♥

Saturday, November 16, 2013

That Whole Numbers Game (Hey; Today Is the Seventh Day, By the Way!)...

: My number is 7, so here's 7 facts about me:


  1. I am related to Kirk Douglas somehow (He was a Danilovich. I got asked once if I am related to Kirk Douglas. I said that I'm not. I was wrong, and he even looks like Pop-Pop—he has the "Czarnecki [really, Danilowicz] chin".). I don't know exactly how we're related. I'm not exactly proud of that, by the way—being related to the man who raped Natalie Wood does not do me or my family good, for example.
  2. I am part of at least three unique Ashkenazi families: The Foczkos, the Trudnyaks, and the Andrulewiczes (and I'm related to Teddy Andrulewicz and crossdresser Michael Androlewicz—no; I'm not kidding! By the way, when I Googled to double check, I found a Michael Androlewicz of whom to be proud). I say "unique" because our surnames are unique. We made them up and/or were required to take them around the times that we were required to have surnames.
  3. I've pissed off a lot of people—some for good reasons, some for bad reasons. I can't say that (even when I'm hurt) I'm not proud (or at least ultimately proud) of pissing off people for good reasons.
  4. I do have Sephardic heritage (Dad has Iberian Peninsula atDNA. How else can he explain that? Also, there was a lot of Sephardi minhag practiced in my Ashkenazi family.).
  5. I am of kohenet and Levi descent—I still don't know about the Lazars. I do know that "Duday" or "Dudaj" means "horn"; so I don't question that Rosalia Dudayova Nagyova was a kohenet.
  6. I am not keen on assimilation. I was Googling an "Israel Androlewicz" after I saw his name in a Google search, and this is one of the results with which I came up: "A Winnebago with a little car in tow." Nice, Hank (Not!). Forgive my language, and the self-hating smart*** is reading a "progressive" website (Look for your name on Masada2000's SHIT List, Hank.). This is one example of why—even if I have to wait to do so for the rest of my life or until Yeshua returns—I am marrying a fellow Messianic Jew and making aliyah as soon as possible.
  7. I am still struggling with TrP pain in my lower back—it flares up from time to time.
By the way, you don't have play the numbers game if you don't want to do so; but ask me if you want a number (and mine if you're a Messianic Jew—especially a Levi or a kohen—but not if you're one of those meshuga "Hebrew roots", "Torah keepers", "Sacred Name", or "KJV only" types). 

Monday, November 11, 2013

Status Update For November 11, 2013 at 2:51:24 AM

I still found no baptism record for Ilona Lazarova Hanzokova; but I did find some for (I think) some cousins of hers. It looks like she became an Anusit later on—and after some family had already become Anusim (just like with the Foczkos—we didn't join Anusi relatives until 50 years or more after they had become Anusim. The Foczkos had gone to Gelnica and Kosjov first. Then we came into Zlata Idka. As far as the Lazars, we were either already in Zlata Idka or came there from another city in Moldava nad Bodvou—since Ilona doesn't have a baptism record, I can't tell you. Apparently, all of them but for Ilona and her family became Anusim in the 1760s-1810s. There were some open Jews in Zlata Idka, and there are even Jewish graves there; but I can't tell you whether they're Lazar graves or not.).

As much as anyone wants to try to dispute (and as much as the Devil wants to whisper doubts) that we're bnei-Anusim, we're bnei-Anusim (and some of us are still Anusim, clearly. Feel free to do the searches yourself, by the way, in case you're doubting me:

1) Lazars in Moldava nad Bodvou

2) Foczkos in Continental Europe

3) Fockos in Continental Europe

You can uncheck "Match exactly" in case you want to look for mispelled, misindexed, etc. records, too.

As usual, keep praying for me and...

.ל'לילה ושבוע טוב ומבורך תכתבו

Also, please vote and share in the poll for my Poli 301 project if you can—I need 25 votes to begin examining and analyzing data, and 3,000 votes for an acceptable research sample. By the way, 25*120 = 3,000; so if the minimum number of voters vote and share the poll (whether directly sharing or indirectly sharing) the poll with 120 people (e.g., "indirectly sharing" being that a friend of a mutual friend shared the poll with his friends; "directly sharing" being that you posted the poll to your Facebook wall, RTed it, or shared it on Sodahead), I could get 3,000 votes. Thanks.