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Showing posts with label professional networking. Show all posts
Showing posts with label professional networking. Show all posts

Tuesday, July 5, 2016

Originally On LinkedIn: Why I Have Nine Pending LinkedIn Invitations: Hint: I'm Not Here To Facebook

The theme of how LinkedIn has gone from a professional-networking forum to a social-media forum with even some cesspool parts has obviously become a recurring theme. I myself have been will be the first to admit that I've probably or even definitely contributed to that in part: i.e., I've likely posted more Facebookesque content and/or content in more of a Facebookesque way than I should have. 
I nonetheless have tried to keep LinkedIn a professional-networking forum on my end, and I've written that I hope that Microsoft's buyout of LinkedIn would affect LinkedIn to rebecome LinkedIn instead of another Facebook, Twitter, or WhatsApp or whatever other "What's that app?" social-media application. By the way, "application" is of course the term that most professionals are supposed to call an "app"—after all, a separation of standard language and colloquialisms/dialects/"slang" exists along with the separation of the professional and personal realms—unless one has to utilize slang terms in his or her field (e.g., if he or she is a general-demographics researcher with Pew or a TMZ reporter, or an analyst and a commentator), he or she might as well leave his or her colloquial way of speaking in his or her personal realm (e.g., at home)!
On that note, one ought to leave—or at least try to leave—his or her way of connecting with people in his or her personal realm—including in regard to how he or she uses social media—within his or her personal realm. For my part, I've either rejected LinkedIn invitations, held off on accepting LinkedIn invitations, and even removed LinkedIn connections; and I've even reported people whose LinkedIn profiles have looked suspicious. 
In conclusion, I suggest that my currently-backlogged connection inviters and others understand—especially if I did not make clear in many of my previous LinkedIn posts—that I'm here to professionally network, not open another social media account, and that I won't be reaching out to or accepting the reachings out of many people—and even on Facebook and other social-media forums that I do use, I don't reach out to or accept the reachings out of many people, even though I'm aspiring to be an analyst and a commentator whom needs to network as much as any other aspiring and professional analyst-commentator needs to network.
Incidentally, while I believe that "to network" is a professionally-acceptable infinitive, and the conjugations thereof are professionally acceptable, I want someone to correct me if my belief is erroneous. 

Monday, June 13, 2016

Originally On LinkedIn: Will Microsoft Clean Up LinkedIn? Let's Hope—I Myself've Had Enough Of LinkedIn Being A Facebook | Nicole V. Czarnecki | Pulse | LinkedIn

When I read that LinkedIn will come under the umbrella of Microsoft at a price of $26.2B, I thought, "I just hope that their investment's worth it." Since Bill Gates is a technological pioneer, job creator, and philanthropist, though, it probably is. "Probably", of course, concerns whether Bill Gates has Microsoft and LinkedIn create jobs and retain employees within the United States—and even allied countries, especially where American expats live.
If Bill Gates and LinkedIn under Microsoft outsource (at least to tenuous allies, and somehow even to enemies—which they could scarily do), then LinkedIn'd've been better off remaining under its own umbrella. If, on the other hand, Bill Gates and Microsoft employ within and keep employees from the United States—and allied countries such as Israel, where many America-born olim and their sabra descendants live—then LinkedIn may reform and thrive under the Microsoft umbrella.
Besides, for LinkedIn to hire in, e.g., Tel Aviv and Jerusalem would take ko'ach after they stood in solidarity with Orlando—as opposed to the chutzpah that taking the usual path of least resistance would take. After all, by the way, plenty of out-of-work Sodastream alumni would consider a job at LinkedIn—perhaps especially if they're already using LinkedIn to try to find a jobs in lieu of their jobs at Sodastream, and perhaps if they want to work at LinkedIn to help others find jobs through the company through and at which they find jobs.
As I stated, let's hope that Bill Gates and Microsoft wisely invested $26.2B into bringing LinkedIn under their umbrella—since those who want to use LinkedIn as a professional network, the American out-of-work-for-now workforce, and out-of-work Sodastream almuni are among those whom count on Bill Gates and Microsoft to help put them to work by putting $26.2B to work. 

Friday, May 27, 2016

Originally On LinkedIn: The Injustice Of How Job Seekers Like Me Are Under the Radar Of Recruiters On LinkedIn(-Turned-Facebook?) | Nicole V. Czarnecki | LinkedIn

via Baker131313 on Wikimedia Commons


This issue reoccurs and reoccurs because of people whom use LinkedIn as another social-network link. Even today, someone who I'm following on LinkedIn had to ask someone else to "kindly refrain" from sharing a lewd and sexist photo on the "professional environment" that LinkedIn is supposed to be—and this person is already luckily in the workforce. As for people like me, the best that we can do is report that kind of content—and I was about to report the post until I saw the comment of whom I'm following. Needlessly to say, I liked the comment and did not feel the need to report the post once I could assent with a "Be professional" sentiment.
This doesn't change, however, that I majored in Political Science and paid attention in Political Research Methods 301 only to have my applications of my learning get entirely ignored while the LinkedIn abusers get commended. So much for the apparently-lazy Millennial stating this regarding a study about workaholism while professionals lazily abuse LinkedIn:
This is generalizable among and extrapolatable to only Norwegians. A study in a more-diverse country needs to be done.
I could be tempted to say that I wasted my time going to college since the LinkedIn misusers are wasting my and other aspiring professionals' time, anyway. Nonetheless, I can at least stand up at the end of the day and testify that the apparently-lazy Millennial had the integrity to at least try to go to college (which I did, and I graduated college with a B.A. in Political Science despite my Cerebral Palsy, mental illnesses, and other issues), the integrity and persistence to keep seeking a job despite that I'm a stigma with or without a college degree (since the sad reality is that those of us who have physical disabilities and mental illnesses are stigmas in of ourselves according to society, including the workforce whom deliberately looks us over and shuns us otherwise), and the integrity, persistence, and determination to find a job by using LinkedIn and other resources (including social media, such as Facebook and Blogger) appropriately (After all, e.g., Hadassa WordPress reached out to me when I was blogging with "The Times Of Israel"—and that's part of why I've had one book published so far, and I've not stated that I'm an aspiring author for nothing.).
I am—as others are—trying to use LinkedIn to meet professional goals, and I'd like to see those whom use LinkedIn to meet social-media goals go meet their social-media goals elsewhere and save LinkedIn for professional pursuits. 
PS Per the image above, via Baker131313 on Wikimedia Commons: the image fits because I have Depression; my aunt attempted suicide in my last year of college, and my estranged paternal grandfather died while I was studying for final-semester exams. Yet, here I am being paid only ~$25,000 in student debt and joblessness almost three years after graduation while LinkedIn abusers have jobs and money to cover their bills.