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Showing posts with label abuse. Show all posts
Showing posts with label abuse. Show all posts

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

No...You Think, Alec Baldwin?

Blaming other people for your verbal and other abuse only damages your daughter more, by the way:

"'It’s thrown in your face every day. There are people who admonish me, or attack me, and use that as a constant spearhead to do that. It’s a scab that never heals cause it’s being picked at all the time by other people. My daughter, that’s hurt her in a permanent way.'”

Of course verbal-abuse and other-abuse survivors (and others whom were affected, such as primary and secondary witnesses) never forget—we may forgive, though it may take a long time and we may relapse into unforgiveness; and we may not hold grudges (which is what "forgive and forget" really means*, although part of relapsing into unforgiveness includes relapsing into holding grudges); but what we won't forget, even when specific instances are far enough in the back of our minds, in our subconsciouses, or repressed altogether and in the inaccessible parts of our memories.


*It's as when God says that He'll "remember [our] sins no more" and that love "keeps no record of wrongs"—in other words, He won't hold what we did against us; but He doesn't forget what we did.

Wednesday, October 26, 2016

Though I Forgive And Don't Begrudge, I Don't Forget

I'd be absolutely foolish to let my guard down and pretend that someone didn't wrong me when he or she did wrong me, especially when he or she comes back to slander and/or libel me about what he or she said and/or did. In fact, as I've come to know because of how I was abused during my childhood, one's placement of blame on his or her victim of slander and/or libel is abuse on top of abusethat kind of abuse is known as verbal abuse and/or emotional/mental abuse:

  • Verbal Abuse occurs when one person uses words and body language to inappropriately criticize another person. Verbal abuse often involves 'putdowns' and name-calling intended to make the victim feel they are not worthy of love or respect, and that they do not have ability or talent. If the victim speaks up against these statements, they are often told that the criticisms were "just a joke", and that it is their own problem that they do not find the joke funny. They may also be told that no abuse is happening; that it is "all in their head". Verbal abuse is dangerous because it is often not easily recognized as abuse, and therefore it can go on for extended periods, causing severe damage to victim's self-esteem and self-worth. Damaged victims may fail to take advantage of opportunities that would enrich their lives because they come to believe they are not worthy of those opportunities.
  • Psychological Abuse (also known as mental abuse or emotional abuse) occurs when one person controls information available to another person so as to manipulate that person's sense of reality; what is acceptable and what is not acceptable. For example, [a form of the most-extreme kinds of] psychological abuse [occurs] when a pedophile tells a child victim that [he or] she caused the pedophile to abuse [him or] her because [he or] she is a 'slut' who 'tempted' the pedophile. Psychological abuse often contains strong emotionally manipulative content designed to force the victim to comply with the abuser's wishes. It may be emotional abuse in this sense when it is designed to cause emotional pain to victims or to “mess with their heads” in attempts to gain compliance and counter any resistance. Alternatively, psychological abuse may occur when one victim is forced to watch another be abused in some fashion (verbally, emotionally, physically or sexually). Like verbal abuse, psychological abuse is often not recognized as abuse early on and can result in serious sequela (psychological after effects) later on.


You'd be foolish to think that I won't call you out on it or take other actions of admonishment regarding you, and I have even reported threats of violence on Twitter to both Twitter and the authorities. Imagine, then, what actions of admonishment I'd take offline if I'm willing to report threats that are seemingly small because they are online—for example, I'd threaten to sue you if I had to do so, whether I'd get a pro-bono lawyer or ask the court to make you pay legal costs and any necessary damage payments. By the way, ask a few people whom I had to threaten with legal action for their clear violation of the ADA—once I threatened the action and reaffirmed my threat, they suddenly decided to make the accommodation which they needed to make.

In conclusion, I remind you that "forgive and forget" means "forgive and don't begrudge"—not "forgive and pretend that it never happened".



Tuesday, July 19, 2016

Imagine If You Will...

The board of directors and shareholders in a given company go to elect a new CEO. The head of the board has his candidate in mind and helps his candidate to override the will of the majority of the board and of the shareholders, and he is complicit with the candidate in unethically and illegally getting the candidate elected to be the CEO. 
Among the unethical and illegal means that he employs and/or encourages are intimidation of board members and shareholders—as well as of any employees whom are not on the board and still have a say, changes in the board-election rules, and forcibly giving all of the votes to his candidate in spite of the protests from those whose votes were forcibly given to a candidate for whom they not vote. The intimidation, by the way, includes violations of the Civil Rights and Equal Opportunity Employment Act—and those violations include death threats.
If only you only imagined that—that is, after all, akin to what happened with the nomination of Donald Trump as the Republican nominee for President of the United States. In this case, the CEO and the Head Of the Board Of Directors are, respectively, Donald Trump and Reince Priebus. As for the company in this case, it is the Republican Party—its board members, shareholders, and employees are the delegates at the GOP Convention, donors, and the voters. 
Just as the FBI, DOJ, and others would investigate a company such as the one which was described above, the FBI, DOJ, and others will have to investigate Donald Trump and Reince Priebus, among others. By the way, I have received quite a few of the threats, and one fellow Twitter user even admitted to voting for Donald Trump in three states.


Friday, May 27, 2016

Originally On LinkedIn: The Injustice Of How Job Seekers Like Me Are Under the Radar Of Recruiters On LinkedIn(-Turned-Facebook?) | Nicole V. Czarnecki | LinkedIn

via Baker131313 on Wikimedia Commons


This issue reoccurs and reoccurs because of people whom use LinkedIn as another social-network link. Even today, someone who I'm following on LinkedIn had to ask someone else to "kindly refrain" from sharing a lewd and sexist photo on the "professional environment" that LinkedIn is supposed to be—and this person is already luckily in the workforce. As for people like me, the best that we can do is report that kind of content—and I was about to report the post until I saw the comment of whom I'm following. Needlessly to say, I liked the comment and did not feel the need to report the post once I could assent with a "Be professional" sentiment.
This doesn't change, however, that I majored in Political Science and paid attention in Political Research Methods 301 only to have my applications of my learning get entirely ignored while the LinkedIn abusers get commended. So much for the apparently-lazy Millennial stating this regarding a study about workaholism while professionals lazily abuse LinkedIn:
This is generalizable among and extrapolatable to only Norwegians. A study in a more-diverse country needs to be done.
I could be tempted to say that I wasted my time going to college since the LinkedIn misusers are wasting my and other aspiring professionals' time, anyway. Nonetheless, I can at least stand up at the end of the day and testify that the apparently-lazy Millennial had the integrity to at least try to go to college (which I did, and I graduated college with a B.A. in Political Science despite my Cerebral Palsy, mental illnesses, and other issues), the integrity and persistence to keep seeking a job despite that I'm a stigma with or without a college degree (since the sad reality is that those of us who have physical disabilities and mental illnesses are stigmas in of ourselves according to society, including the workforce whom deliberately looks us over and shuns us otherwise), and the integrity, persistence, and determination to find a job by using LinkedIn and other resources (including social media, such as Facebook and Blogger) appropriately (After all, e.g., Hadassa WordPress reached out to me when I was blogging with "The Times Of Israel"—and that's part of why I've had one book published so far, and I've not stated that I'm an aspiring author for nothing.).
I am—as others are—trying to use LinkedIn to meet professional goals, and I'd like to see those whom use LinkedIn to meet social-media goals go meet their social-media goals elsewhere and save LinkedIn for professional pursuits. 
PS Per the image above, via Baker131313 on Wikimedia Commons: the image fits because I have Depression; my aunt attempted suicide in my last year of college, and my estranged paternal grandfather died while I was studying for final-semester exams. Yet, here I am being paid only ~$25,000 in student debt and joblessness almost three years after graduation while LinkedIn abusers have jobs and money to cover their bills. 

Wednesday, May 4, 2016

Rejection Hurts. Even For-the-Best-Rejection Hurts.


Examples of hurtful, good and bad, rejections:

  1. Societal rejection, which effects mass-scale evils such as the Holocaust and the continuing rise of Donald Trump. For Jews, Blacks, Hispanics, and other peoples; women, people with disabilities, and immigrants to be told, "You don't count;" "you're not a part of America", etc. hurts—didn't Jews already suffer rejection during the Holocaust, including in the U.S. (when, e.g., Bernard Baruch was blamed for the "Jew Deal" and the "S.S. St. Louis" was turned away)? Didn't Blacks already suffer with Jim Crow and the Nadir? Didn't Hispanics already suffer with being stereotyped during "Operation Wetback"? Never mind that women suffered until even decades after Susan B. Anthony came along, and never mind that people with disabilities are still mistreated (by those such as Dana Stubblefield and TMZ, whom went after the rape victim and her "bizarre profile"—shame on TMZ for going after a person with intellectual disabilities, let alone a person with intellectual disabilities whom was trying to find a job and got raped at work!). 
  2. Familial rejection—all one, e.g., has to do is read the headlines about how a mother murdered her four-year-old child whom had Cystic Fibrosis and how female middle- and high-school students throw away their newly-born children as if the children are disposable tampons or medical waste such as pushed-out kidney stones.
  3. Romantic rejection—especially for people whom've been abused and/or whom are disabled, both having to reject romantic prospects and being rejected as a romantic prospect hurts. I've been on both sides of the rejector-rejectee coin—I had to call the police on each ex after I broke up with him, and I'm a stigma in myself because of my disabilities and having been abused (verbally, emotionally, spiritually, mentally, and physically) in the past. Also refer to the point about societal rejection—I'm not the only person with disabilities (including mental illnesses) who's been seen as a romantic liability and/or undesirable.
  4. Professional rejection—e.g., getting a book manuscript rejected (which just happened to me, and I'm trying to find out how I can improve and resubmit the manuscript), résumé rejections, and rejections that stem from societal rejections (e.g., Refer to the point about Dana Stubblefield's victim, whom was raped on the job that she finally found; and read some of Jeff Woodward's writings and writings that Jeff Woodward has shared—which prove my point that ableism is rampant in the workplace because it is rampant in society, despite that my family refuses to believe me).
  5. Rejection by friends—or at least whom you thought were friends—and mentors—or at least whom you thought were mentors. Rejection, of course, includes betrayal—and one example of betrayal is Dr. Ben Carson's betrayal of African Americans by his endorsement of Donald Trump and slamming of Harriet Tubman's being placed on the $20 bill.
Most of the rejection types and examples thereof are bad rejections, although even the bad rejections—as hurtful as they are—have at least some good in them. e.g.:

  1. Non Trumpites have found out just really how America's colors run or don't run—even if there's a silent majority whom won't speak against Donald Trump (and Donald Trump's friend Hillary Clinton).
  2. People whose families rejected them sometimes don't even have to live in an increasingly-cruel and -miserable world, let alone among cruel and miserable families.
  3. One finds out and/or is reminded of what true love is and what true love isn't.
  4. One is forced to either carry on and/or even improve if doing so is possible.
  5. If someone seems too good to be truly good, they may just be—e.g., Dr. Ben Carson has shown how much intelligence does not equal wisdom, and how the supposedly-outsider conservative and retired neurosurgeon-turned-aspiring-POTUS is really a Dixiecrat to the core—one can't be a true Republican and good role model for African-American young men and women if he supports Tammany-Hall Trump and Andrew Jackson over Harriet Tubman.

Sunday, March 27, 2016

Originally On Writerbear Brussels Deserved The Attacks For Anti Semitism...According To, Among Others, Asher Schwartz And

Asher Schwartz and "The Jewish Press" posted a despicable editorial cartoon that blamed Belgium for Daesh's attacks on it. The Facebook page "Documenting Anti Semitism" shared the cartoon, and I began writing the following in the comments section until I realized that reporting such victim-shaming and giving everyone else the heads up might be a better idea.

Needlessly to mention, Asher Schwartz and "The Jewish Press" are also on notice that victim shaming is unacceptable to and unwelcome by the majority of 'am Yisra'el:

"Wow. Victim shaming much? This surely wasn't the attitude of Asher Schwartz and 'The Jewish Press ' about the 9/11 attacks, or after the attacks in Paris?
"The U.S. under the Carter and Clinton Administrations was particularly Anti Israel; so, did the U.S. get what it deserved post Clinton? BTW, Daesh is doing to Europe what Al Qadea did to the U.S.: targeting the Jews among them.
"In other words, are we to blame for what Daesh did to those of us in Paris and Brussels, and what Al Qadea did here? That's ultimately what Asher Schwartz and 'The Jewish Press' are saying. After all, just as Al Qadea wanted to target Jews*, Daesh wants to target Jews; and for 'The Jewish Press' to encourage Asher Schwartz to blame an Anti-Semitic attack on victims of Anti Semitism is akin to what Daesh and its influencers do and did—after all, Daesh's influences include a Nazi government that blamed Jews in Europe for Kristallnacht, don't they?"
*Per Page 251 of the "9/11 Commission Report":
"Mullah Omar is reported to have opposed this course of action for ideological reasons rather than out of fear of U.S.retaliation.He is said to have preferred for al Qaeda to attack Jews, not necessarily the United States. KSM contends that Omar faced pressure from the Pakistani government to keep al Qaeda from engaging in operations outside Afghanistan. Al Qaeda’s chief financial manager,Sheikh Saeed, argued that al Qaeda should defer to the Taliban’s wishes. "

Sunday, May 3, 2015

An Open Letter To Everyone Whom Has And/Or Could Harass And Bully Me For My Beliefs, Etc.

The non-underlined text is in regards to what prompted me to write this letter to a specific person. The underlined text is specific and general, as I have had others similarly harass and bully me in the past:

My belief in Yeshua is not relevant to the subject of homosexual acts as to how that the treated in the Torah, which is a common ground for both Messianic and Non-Messianic Jews. I even told a fellow Messianic that proselytizing is unacceptable and intolerable. Your attempt to embarrass me for my beliefs is a violation of the Facebook TOS as well as Torah.

Per the Facebook TOS alone:

1) "We respect other people's rights, and expect you to do the same.
You will not post content or take any action on Facebook that infringes or violates someone else's rights or otherwise violates the law. 

"We can remove any content or information you post on Facebook if we believe that it violates this Statement or our policies."

2) "Posting things that don't follow the Facebook Community Standards (ex: threats, hate speech, graphic violence).

Using Facebook to bully, impersonate or harass anyone.

Abusing Facebook features (ex: sending friend requests to a lot of people you don't know). Overusing features could make other people feel uncomfortable or unsafe. As a result, we have limits in place to restrict the rate at which you can use features. Learn more about these limits." 

3) "We don’t tolerate bullying or harassment. We allow you to speak freely on matters and people of public interest, but remove content that appears to purposefully target private individuals with the intention of degrading or shaming them. This content includes, but is not limited to: "

4) "Content that attacks people based on their actual or perceived race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sex, gender, sexual orientation, disability or disease is not allowed. We do, however, allow clear attempts at humor or satire that might otherwise be considered a possible threat or attack. This includes content that many people may find to be in bad taste (ex: jokes, stand-up comedy, popular song lyrics, etc.)." (What Facebook considers hate speech)


If you attempt to embarrass or shame me again, I will look into having charges for cyberbullying, hate crimes, and civil-rights violations pressed against you.

Saturday, April 4, 2015

Thanking All Who Liked My Page Recently and Like My Page, And...


  1. לפסח ושבת שלום ומבורך לכולם. (For a peaceful and blessed Passover and Sabbath to all.)
  2. For Messianic Jews/Jewish Christians, remember why we (and gentile Christians) celebrate פסח: 
  • "שמרו זאת בזיכרון של לי."
  • "בכל שעה שאתם אוכלים מצה הזאת ושותים הכוס הזה, אתם מכריזים המות שלי עד אני באה."
(If you don't read even some Hebrew, use Google Translate to translate it. Incidentally, I used Hebrew-Verbs.co.il, Milon, and other sources [including what I remembered from studying Hebrew in college] to translate it into Hebrew].)

Also, G-d willing, I'll try to record videos on, among other subjects:

  1. Bladder cancer, since I do volunteer for the Bladder Cancer Advocacy NetworkAs I explained to the recruiter (Natalie Bennett), I have a history of other cancers (e.g., Colon Cancer) in my family (e.g., Pop-Pop had it. BTW, he also died of Myelodysplasia that turned into Leukemia), and I can imagine that Bladder Cancer is exacerbated by conditions such as IBS (which I have) and, of course, Colon Cancer.  By the way, when I talked to Natalie, I learned that Bladder Cancer is the most-diagnosed cancer in the United States, despite that it hardly gets awareness raised for it (compared to, e.g., Breast Cancer. Great-Granddad's cousin Katarzyna Czerniecka Czokola, as I found out, did die of Breast Cancer, by the way.).
  2. Why Russia and the Middle East are, quite frankly, their own continents, despite their current classification. Technically, Central America could be its own continent, too.
  3. What "few in number" for Israel might actually mean (i.e., depending on who is considered Jewish ethnically and/or spiritually Biblically and amongst Jews. Either way, we're "few in number" from at least an ethnic standpoint.)
Meanwhile, ללילה ושבת ופסח טוב ושלום ומבורך לכל ישראל וצדוקים מגויים.

PS Part of the reason that I promoted my Facebook page is to (hopefully) get noted for my commentary and (G-d willing) get a job as a commentator and an analyst. Being, e.g., on SSI benefits sucks (and I opposed being on them at first, feeling that doing so was a form of socialism and being a burden on the tax payers. Besides, I have been persecuted for being on them [See below for a horrid example.]. But what can I do when, e.g., I have C.P., no paying job, etc.?)


JohnLeePedimore has replied to your comment on Shocking Video: Should "Adult Baby" Collect Social Security Benefits?:
@Nickidewbear

Let me guess,your family actually works for a living and turned their back on you because you are a lazy pig.
You can reply back by visiting the comments page.
By the way, did you know you can rent movies from YouTube? Check it out now: youtube.com/movies.
© 2011 YouTube, LLC
Also PS: I save most of my emails. BTW, I just noticed this now-just-reported comment, too:
It's bad enough that you people leech off the American taxpayer like parasites,but what really pisses me off is the utter contempt you have for the hard working people who foot the bill for your lazy ass.You don't appreciate anything you have because you didn't have to work for it. You are a thief.
Then people swear that attitudes toward people with disabilities has changed...actually, it has gotten worse. Then they want me to represent people with disabilities when they act like I, a person who lives with a disability, don't know what I'm talking about....no kidding, as one Haggadah reads (with my emphasis and bracketed additions), that :
Access to affordable housing, quality health care, nutritious food and quality education is far from equal. The disparity between the privileged and the poor is growing, with opportunities for upward mobility still gravely limited. Maimonides taught, “Everyone in the house of Israel is obligated to study Torah, regardless of whether one is rich or poor, physically able or with a physical disability.” Unequal access to basic human needs [e.g., being treated as a human being who was created in the image of G-d], based on one’s real or perceived identity, like race, gender or disability, is a plague, antithetical to the inclusive spirit of the Jewish tradition.
And
We do not adequately address violence in our society, including rape, sex trafficking, child abuse, domestic violence and elder abuse [including verbal, mental/psychological, religious/spiritual, and other intangible/non-physical abuse; and neglect], even though it happens every day within our own communities.

Sunday, March 29, 2015

When a Ger Tzedek Sheds Light On What G-d Meant in the B'rit Chadashah


Guys listen up: Eve was deceived in the garden, but Adam CHOSE disobedience! #fb Please discuss...
Posted by Kevin McCullough on Sunday, September 22, 2013


Sadly, even gerim such as John Gill were willing to follow the usual, stripped-of context interpretation, though. e.g.:


And therefore she is called by the Jews F16 (Nweh Ma) , "the mother of iniquity and sin"; to which they refer, ( Psalms 51:5 ) . And they say, F17 she was the cause of death to Adam, and to all the world: (See Gill on Romans 5:12). And they observe F18 the order of the punishment of the serpent, Eve, and Adam, as of their sin; the serpent was first accursed, then Eve, and last of all Adam. They say
 ``F19 Samael (the devil) could not subvert Adam, till the serpent came and turned the heart of Eve, and Eve turned his heart, and they both sinned; wherefore it is said, "the woman which thou gavest me"; Samael had no power to turn him, till Eve came, and she was the cause of his eating.''


To take the easy way out is to deliberately forget, e.g.:


  1. Paul knew Torah and the rest of Tanakh well, in case you forget. He knew about D'vorah the wife of Lapidot.
  2. He knew about Rut, who laid down at the feet of Bo'az.
  3. He knew about the mother of Lemu'el.
  4. He knew about the Malkat Sheva.
  5. He was of the same tribe as Hadassah.

Tuesday, November 4, 2014

147 Years Ago Yesterday, And The Disastrous Effects Which It Affected

On November 2, 1877, a newborn boy named András Rusznák was baptized. András was apparently just another Slovakian boy being baptized in Zlatá Idka, Slovakia (then Aranyida, Ausztria Magyarország) on, of all days, All Souls' Day. So, he allegedly was a newborn boy of Slovakian ethnicity being baptized on a special day. What's the big deal, then?

The big deal is this boy was neither a Slovakian ethnic or a real recipient of the Sacrament of Baptism. Speaking of souls as well, his parents' souls were not even into baptizing him at all. Furthermore, they themselves were נשמות אנוסים—forced souls. They weren't even there in Aranyida to be there.

They were there because they, Jakub and Marysia "Maria" Nováková, were בני אנוסים who just didn't feel comfortable returning to the shtetl of Kassa (now Košice) in nominally-religious-freedom-supporting Ausztria Magyarország (In fact, a Levite like Jakub—a kohen by the name of Fritzwould become an אנוסים in the next century. So, supposedly-tolerant Ausztria Magyarország wasn't so tolerant after all, and apparently became worse by the time that Fritz Kohn "Kerry" was persecuted.). 

András Rusznák himself, however, did leave Aranyida, though he also didn't return to his ancestral shtetl. He, with a Molnár cousin, immigrated to the United States and lived no differently than Jakub (the son of אנוסים György "Kvetkovits" Rusznák HaLevi and Erzsébet Rusznáková née Molnárová) had lived in Ausztria Magyarország—that is, he lived as an אנוסי. After he did that, disaster struck.

András came to the United States in 1902 and never thought that he would receive a letter from his Kassa-residing cousins, let alone one in which a request for help was written. 40-42 years later, however, that kind of letter was received by him and his daughter Mary Rusnak Gaydos. Thus, the boundary that was erected by the Kassa relatives' sitting שבעה was broken—or so the Kassa cousins hoped. 

Besides, they weren't sending a letter of reconciliation. They were sending a letter for העזרה לענין פיקוח נפש—help for the sake of piku'ach nefesh. They weren't looking after just themselves, either—they had families for whom to care and cousins who also had families, and family members in הארץ ישראל (which the Nazis and the Grand Mufti [ימח שמם] were targeting in their Middle Eastern invasion). 

As I alluded to, disaster then struck. András Rusznák (now Andrew Rusnak) and Mary Rusnak Gaydos, in order to cover that they were Jewish and follow the isolationist policy of the United States under Anti-Semitic Franklin Roosevelt (ימח שמם)—ceased all correspondence with their Kassa cousins, most of whom were murdered in השואה (Andrew's and Mary's kind of attitude, by the way, also had affects on the S.S. St. Louis Incident.),

Then Andrew, now the widower of  Julia Fosko Rusnak (née Juliana Foczková, ז'ל) was stricken with cancer and died of it. By the way, Julia (an אישה צדיקה and a לוית צדיקה) was taken before she had to see all that would befall her husband and her oldest child. After that, Andrew and whoever wrote his obituary (presumably Mary) decided to invent a fictional brother for Andrew (Stef) and lie to Andrew's son Carl (an איש צדיק) , who was charged with filling out with his father's death certificate.

As for the disasters that befell Mary—well, I can safely say that, for example, having a granddaughter who attempted suicide and living to attend the funeral of her great-grandson who drowned count as two disasters (She died in 1992, just after the deceased great-grandson's sister was born, by the way. The decedent drowned in 1991. So, she was alive when a descendant died and didn't live to see another descendant grow before her eyes.). 

By the way, all I received were evasive answers when I asked further questions about the supposed uncle of Mary, who allegedly wrote a letter to her in 1947. Also, there is no baptism record for him. So (so to speak), another hole was shot into that "Relatives wrote letters to ask for money, and she stopped writing" סיפור פיות. 

So, what's the point? The point is the point that I made on Twitter, and this account is a case in point:

[F]orcing someone against his or her will always ends in disastrous results somewhere along the line.




     

Thursday, July 17, 2014

"Honoring Our Fathers"

Conversely, the dads need to be responsible dads in the first place. Think about Stuart Dauermann's comment to Jews for Jesus' David Brickner regarding the exploitative "That Jew Died For You" video. In this case, we could take "That Jew Died For You" for especially fathers who abuse (e.g., commit violence against and/or neglect) to their children and/or their childrens' mothers in the name of God and "well-deserved backlash...and...comments that are piling up" for "a pop culture that constantly disrespects and mocks fathers."

"You will discover that your message is not getting across, but that people are repelled, disgusted, and enraged. Paul reminds us that it is no compliment when “the name of God is blasphemed among the Gentiles because of you.” [Romans 2:24]"

In the same way that Anti-Semitic gentiles and Anti-Messianic Jews eagerly use "That Jew Died For You" to turn Jews away from Jesus, so the world eagerly bashes the role of fatherhood because of especially so-called "Judeo-Christian", "red-blooded God-and-country" heads of households who are more than willing to (for example, and quite classically) twist verses such as Ephesians 5:22 and 6:1-3 (the latter of which got twisted on me constantly by my self-hating and abusive dad—who at least, by the way to his credit, would find "That Jew For You" highly unacceptable. After all, keep in mind that this the guy who deliberately drew a swastika just to throw it into his lit fireplace when I was having an OCD flareup one time.). 

Thursday, February 20, 2014

To My Persecutors...

I ask you to examine yourself. Contrary to what you want to think, I mean no harm against you or anyone else. In fact, especially if you claim to be wise, remember that "[r]ebuke is more effective for a wise man
Than a hundred blows on a fool."

This is part of why I am dealing with you. I think about you and I think about others. My actions are not just for me or my benefit. I always dread (read: sadly expect) that someone will eventually try to oppose me. I am not perfect, and I will admit when I am wrong and not walking in integrity. However, I'm right when I'm right, and I'm not right because of me—I'm right when I'm right only because of Christ.

I am not Moses; I am not Jeremiah, and I am not any other of the prophets or righteous people of blessed memories or blessed names—I am not worthy to be even considered among these. Nonetheless, I try to stand up to evil. When I do stand up to evil and you persecute me, I have to ask (as did Moses when our countrymen were persecuting him), "Why do you contend with meWhy do you tempt the Lord?"

Also, why do you glorify the Amaleks—whether or not you mean to do so? The Torah states:

14 Then the Lord said to Moses, “Write this for a memorial in the book and recount it in the hearing of Joshua, that I will utterly blot out the remembrance of Amalek from under heaven.” 15 And Moses built an altar and called its name, The-Lord-Is-My-Banner;[c] 16 for he said, “Because the Lord has sworn: the Lord will have war with Amalek from generation to generation.”

The Torah does not state that we are to remember Amalek in any other way or context but in regards to what he did against Israel. We are not to revive him, and we are not to enable any Amalek in this generation. Even when we do Purim readings in the synagogues (Messianic and otherwise), we do not revive or remember Haman. In fact, we make a deliberate effort to drown out his name when we read it.


We rejoice that Haman (Yemach shemo u'zichrono.) cannot hurt us anymore, and we don't want to hear his name. Nonetheless, we don't (or at least we shouldn't) rejoice in the death of the wicked


Wednesday, February 5, 2014

The Puzzle, Aka "When Honest People Are Screwed Over Because Life Doesn't Fit Face-Value, Sanitized Molds"





In short, life isn't a cry-and-dry mold in of itself. In fact, lives often don't fit molds. There are common threads in every life, and every life is nonetheless like every DNA code: no two are exactly like, even in twins.

Sometimes, that means that a life will be pretty messy and broken, and unable to have its pieces put together for it. For example, with my life, I don't have all of the pieces that can make others see the puzzle of a Crypto Jew's daughter who came from a background that she never expected. Similarly and to a greater degree, Dylan Farrow doesn't have all of the pieces that can make others see that part of her puzzle on which Woody Allen's traumatic abuse against her is painted.

With some people, they'd have to see the puzzle pieces being made and painted on in order for them to believe that the puzzle exists and that the pieces are somewhere out there, if not right there in their faces. Case in point, this is how I got screwed over when I didn't take everything at face value and wanted to make sure that what I saw was everything that was there, and when I laid out a good number of the puzzle pieces that I do have:


Nickidewbear  Photos: 3  ♀Feb 3, 2014, 03:25am  #

This is apparently the marriage certificate of Julian Czernecki's parents (z"l).

  • The apparent marriage certificate.
    The apparent marriage certificate.


Reply    Quote
gask7   ♂Feb 4, 2014, 09:35am     #

From the 6th February 1860 at 4 pm.
Beautiful old Polish language.
Wonderful marriage certificate.
First I need to translate this to nowadays Polish.

Reply    Quote
Nickidewbear  Photos: 3  ♀Feb 4, 2014, 08:02pm  #

gask7:
From the 6th February 1860 at 4 pm.
Beautiful old Polish language.
Wonderful marriage certificate.
First I need to translate this to nowadays Polish.


Thank you so much.

Reply    Quote
Magdalena  Photos: 1  ♀Feb 4, 2014, 10:28pm     #

Maćkowa Ruda. Wigry, 06 February 1860, 4 p.m. This is to announce that in the presence of witnesses: Antoni Wierzbiński, uncle of the newly married householder at Maćkowa Ruda, and Ignacy Majsalski (?), labourer from Mikołajewo, both of 40 years of age, a religious marriage was solemnised today by the undersigned priest between Antoni Czerniecki, bachelor from Maćkowa Ruda living with his parents, born in Krasne to Paweł and Dominika nee Wierzbińska the spouses Czerniecki, aged 20, and Katarzyna Daniłowiczówna, spinster, daughter of Wojciech and Maryanna nee Kruszyńska the spouses Daniłowicz, aged 17, born and resident in Krasne. The marriage was preceded by three banns, the first on the 15th, the second on the 22nd, and the third on the 22nd of January of this year at the Wigry Parish. No impediment to the marriage has been shown to exist. The newlyweds hereby declare that they have not signed a prenuptial agreement. This Certificate has been read to all the participants and witnesses, all of whom are illiterate, and signed by us - Rev. W. Olszewski (?) Parish Priest

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Nickidewbear  Photos: 3  ♀Feb 4, 2014, 10:43pm  #

Thank you so much. Did the certificate specify which priest? I was told by my cousin that it is a non-Catholic certificate.

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Magdalena  Photos: 1  ♀Feb 4, 2014, 11:30pm     #

It doesn't say anything outright, but all the details point to a Roman Catholic wedding - it's in Polish, not Russian, so not Russian Orthodox, and banns and a parish priest are mentioned, so not Jewish. There is nothing in the document pointing to a non-Catholic ceremony. Did your cousin justify their opinion in any way?

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Nickidewbear  Photos: 3  ♀Feb 4, 2014, 11:45pm  #

Magdalena:
It doesn't say anything outright, but all the details point to a Roman Catholic wedding - it's in Polish, not Russian, so not Russian Orthodox, and banns and a parish priest are mentioned, so not Jewish. There is nothing in the document pointing to a non-Catholic ceremony. Did your cousin justify their opinion in any way?


He said, "Mysle ze tak a nawet napewno to sa katolicy no ale tylko tyle znalazlem:)". Roughly, this translates to (as far as I can tell with Google Translate), "I think that so even sure these are not Catholics but only so much I found :)".

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Magdalena  Photos: 1  ♀Edited by: Magdalena  Feb 4, 2014, 11:46pm     #

It says the exact opposite, actually: "I think they were, or I am even sure they were Catholic, but this is only based on this one document (that I found)". Google Translate is NOT to be relied on too heavily.

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Nickidewbear  Photos: 3  ♀Feb 4, 2014, 11:52pm  #

Magdalena:
It says the exact opposite, actually: "I think they were, or I am even sure they were Catholic, but this is only based on this one document". Google Translate is NOT to be relied on too heavily.


Ok. Thanks.

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Nickidewbear  Photos: 3  ♀Yesterday, 12:19am  #

I do have a question, though: why would they fall out with their son if they were Catholic, since he and his wife converted to Catholicism? Also, they didn't fall out until after Great-Granddad was born. Furthermore, why would he have to lie so much on his naturalization, etc. documents?

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Magdalena  Photos: 1  ♀Yesterday, 12:24am     #

they could have quarrelled with their son for any number of reasons, don't you think? and how could he convert to Catholicism if he was clearly born to Catholic parents? as to naturalisation documents, they were filled out by Ellis Island officials who wrote down whatever they thought they heard the immigrants say, or just wrote down what they thought was right, esp. regarding names and surnames. many immigrants were illiterate or half illiterate, so they then made further spelling mistakes in their names as time went on.

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Nickidewbear  Photos: 3  ♀Yesterday, 12:39am  #

Magdalena:
they could have quarrelled with their son for any number of reasons, don't you think? and how could he convert to Catholicism if he was clearly born to Catholic parents? as to naturalisation documents, they were filled out by Ellis Island officials who wrote down whatever they thought they heard the immigrants say, or just wrote down what they thought was right, esp. regarding names and surnames. many immigrants were illiterate or half illiterate, so they then made further spelling mistakes in their names as time went on.


Maybe they were Anusim. His wife wasn't born an Anusit, though; I assure you that. In fact, her branch was a holdout among the Andrulevicuses. She would not have married a Catholic. Also, can you translate this for me? " jak cos znajde to tobie wysle oki:)" I want to make sure that I'm reading what he's saying rightly.

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Magdalena  Photos: 1  ♀Yesterday, 12:57am     #

he's saying "as soon as I find something, I will send it to you, OK?"

do you have any birth, marriage, or death certificates regarding the son's wife, then?
also, all the surnames so far - Czerniecki, Daniłowicz, Wierzbińska, and Kruszyńska, are 100% typical Polish surnames. the same goes for the given names - Paweł, Dominika, Wojciech, Maryanna, Antoni, and Katarzyna.

Reply    Quote
Nickidewbear  Photos: 3  ♀Yesterday, 01:03am  #

Magdalena:
he's saying "as soon as I find something, I will send it to you, OK?"

do you have any birth, marriage, or death certificates regarding the son's wife, then?
also, all the surnames so far - Czerniecki, Daniłowicz, Wierzbińska, and Kruszyńska, are 100% typical Polish surnames. the same goes for the given names - Paweł, Dominika, Wojciech, Maryanna, Antoni, and Katarzyna.


Thank you. I thought that's what it was saying. Yes, I do. She also gave her parents' names as "Anthony" and "Katherine". However, the Andrulevicuses were Jewish. Her mother was a Margiewicz (Morgiewicz/Morgovich. She was related to Shmuil Morgovich of Stakliskes.), and her dad was a Andrulevicus. He had relatives such as Vilgelm Andrulevich, Nik Andrelovich, Rochla Andrelewitz, and Jacob Andralowitz (who they sent a Jewish serviceman's card.). Also, "Pawel" ("Paul") was surprisingly used among Jews (See JewFAQ), and "Danilowicz" simply means "ben-Daniel".

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Magdalena  Photos: 1  ♀Yesterday, 01:22am     #

Nickidewbear:
"Danilowicz" simply means "ben-Daniel".


Daniłowicz is both a Russian and a Polish surname; they might even have belonged to the szlachta.

Nickidewbear:
She also gave her parents' names as "Anthony" and "Katherine"


Antoni and Katarzyna were very popular given names at the time, so there is no reason to believe she would be lying. E.g. every other woman in my father's family was baptised Katarzyna over a period of almost 100 years.

Nickidewbear:
However, the Andrulevicuses were Jewish. Her mother was a Margiewicz (Morgiewicz/Morgovich. She was related to Shmuil Morgovich of Stakliskes.), and her dad was a Andrulevicus. He had relatives such as Vilgelm Andrulevich, Nik Andrelovich, Rochla Andrelewitz, and Jacob Andralowitz (who they sent a Jewish serviceman's card.)


How do you know they were all related? Just curious. My dad tried to find information about the Lithuanian / Belorussian part of his family, but most of the family records on that side had been burnt as a result of the Bolshevik Revolution and WW2 atrocities... He could only go as far back as the early twenties (i.e., within living memory).

Nickidewbear:
 Her mother was a Margiewicz


Morgiewicz / Margiewicz is also a Polish szlachta surname.

http://www.genealogiapolska.pl/search.php?mybool=AND&nr=50&tree=- x--all--x-&mylastname=margiewicz&lnqualify=contains&myfirstname=& mysuffix=

You seem to have a whole bunch of szlachta surnames in your family, all in all :-)
Of course, you might also be descended from the peasants who worked for and then were freed by these szlachta families, as it was the custom to grant such peasants the surname of their former master.

Reply    Quote
Nickidewbear  Photos: 3  ♀Yesterday, 02:06am  #

Magdalena:
Nickidewbear:"Danilowicz" simply means "ben-Daniel".

Daniłowicz is both a Russian and a Polish surname; they might even have belonged to the szlachta.


They didn't. Trust me; Pop-Pop tried that canard for years. He tried to connect us to Stefan Czarniecki for years, and he adamantly died that we are Jews . Then he changed his story to, "If we had any Jewish blood, I don't know about it."

Nickidewbear:She also gave her parents' names as "Anthony" and "Katherine"

Antoni and Katarzyna were very popular given names at the time, so there is no reason to believe she would be lying. E.g. every other woman in my father's family was baptised Katarzyna over a period of almost 100 years.


"Katherine" was also a variant of "Tillie". So were "Regina" and "Cecelia", and two of her girls had those names. She also believed in shidduch.

Nickidewbear:However, the Andrulevicuses were Jewish. Her mother was a Margiewicz (Morgiewicz/Morgovich. She was related to Shmuil Morgovich of Stakliskes.), and her dad was a Andrulevicus. He had relatives such as Vilgelm Andrulevich, Nik Andrelovich, Rochla Andrelewitz, and Jacob Andralowitz (who they sent a Jewish serviceman's card.)

How do you know they were all related? Just curious. My dad tried to find information about the Lithuanian / Belorussian part of his family, but most of the family records on that side had been burnt as a result of the Bolshevik Revolution and WW2 atrocities... He could only go as far back as the early twenties (i.e., within living memory).


"Andrulevicus" was exclusively from Stakliskes, and Great-Granddad was born in Tsuman because of his mom's route to and from Lipsk, Poland and Buzhanka in Kiev Gubernia (now Cherkas'ka oblast), Ukraine.

Nickidewbear: Her mother was a Margiewicz

Morgiewicz / Margiewicz is also a Polish szlachta surname.

http://www.genealogiapolska.pl/search.php?mybool=AND&nr=50&tree=-  x--all--x-&mylastname=margiewicz&lnqualify=contains&myfirstname=& mysuffix=

You seem to have a whole bunch of szlachta surnames in your family, all in all :-)
Of course, you might also be descended from the peasants who worked for and then were freed by these szlachta families, as it was the custom to grant such peasants the surname of their former master.


The peasant schtick is probably it. Pop-Pop would have been thrilled to have made the szlachta connection. He could never do it. He kept pulling the Stefan Czarniecki card and told the story of how Great-Granddad came here alone, married Great-Grandma, served in Korea, and died of Black Lung when Dad was 12-never the real story, of how he came as a boy with his parents, married a believing Jew (which made my Anusit great-great-grandma vomit [both figuratively and, I suppose, literally]-and actually literally try to mentally break down my great-grandma, the daughter of a Nagy-Trudnyak and Korsch-Munka who were Anusim), never served this country a day in his life, and committed suicide when Dad was four.

I never even knew that Great-Granddad's siblings existed, let alone that they were born here. Nor did I know that Aunt Mary was named for her grandmothers and not the Virgin-per minhag Sefardi, which my dad's atDNA attests to. Actually, Aunt Mary even said that Pop-Pop would fall asleep in the back of the church when they were younger-which I never would have guessed. Further, their Christmases were very secular-we read "The Night Before Christmas", not the Bible, for example.

Reply    Quote
Magdalena  Photos: 1  ♀Yesterday, 02:34am     #

Nickidewbear:
They didn't. Trust me


But how can you tell one way or the other? Not to mention the fact that there were also Jewish szlachta in Poland, so they could be both.

Nickidewbear:
"Katherine" was also a variant of "Tillie". So were "Regina" and "Cecelia", and two of her girls had those names


I don't understand that part at all. Isn't Tillie a diminutive of Otylie?

Nickidewbear:
She also believed in shidduch.


Matchmaking was not exclusive to Jewish communities, you know.

Nickidewbear:
"Andrulevicus" was exclusively from Stakliskes, and Great-Granddad was born in Tsuman because of his mom's route to and from Lipsk, Poland and Buzhanka in Kiev Gubernia (now Cherkas'ka oblast), Ukraine.


Based on what information?

Nickidewbear:
Actually, Aunt Mary even said that Pop-Pop would fall asleep in the back of the church when they were younger-which I never would have guessed. Further, their Christmases were very secular-we read "The Night Before Christmas", not the Bible, for example.


That's not proof of anything. I am a baptised Catholic yet I never even go to church. ;-)

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Nickidewbear  Photos: 3  ♀Yesterday, 03:23am  #

Magdalena:
Nickidewbear:They didn't. Trust me

But how can you tell one way or the other? Not to mention the fact that there were also Jewish szlachta in Poland, so they could be both.

Nickidewbear:"Katherine" was also a variant of "Tillie". So were "Regina" and "Cecelia", and two of her girls had those names

I don't understand that part at all. Isn't Tillie a diminutive of Otylie?


Yes, but "Tillie" was used among quite a bit among Jews as a Yiddish name. "Katherine" was a secular form of "Tillie".

Nickidewbear:She also believed in shidduch.


Matchmaking was not exclusive to Jewish communities, you know.


Yes, but Catholics could marry for love. Jews weren't allowed to do so in the Old Country.

Nickidewbear:"Andrulevicus" was exclusively from Stakliskes, and Great-Granddad was born in Tsuman because of his mom's route to and from Lipsk, Poland and Buzhanka in Kiev Gubernia (now Cherkas'ka oblast), Ukraine.

Based on what information?


Based on Great-Granddad's Ellis Island record which says "Suman" and Vil'gel'm's voting information for the Duma that says that he lived in Buzhanaka.

Nickidewbear:Actually, Aunt Mary even said that Pop-Pop would fall asleep in the back of the church when they were younger-which I never would have guessed. Further, their Christmases were very secular-we read "The Night Before Christmas", not the Bible, for example.


That's not proof of anything. I am a baptised Catholic yet I never even go to church. ;-)


He faked being devout in my generation. Also, he was not buried in a Catholic cemetery. Furthermore, going to church for him was based on "tradition", not devotion.

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Nickidewbear  Photos: 3  ♀Yesterday, 04:11am  #

Also, many Jews used gentile names. Furthermore, you say, "Czerniecki, Daniłowicz, Wierzbińska, and Kruszyńska, are 100% typical Polish surnames. the same goes for the given names - Paweł, Dominika, Wojciech, Maryanna, Antoni, and Katarzyna." "Maryanna" could have easily been "Maryam Hannah" or "Maryam Khannah". As for "Kruszynska", Jews who converted inSefarad took names like "de la Cruz", "de Jesus", and "de Santa Maria".

According to Ancestry.com, "Polish (Kruszynski): habitational name for someone from any of various places called Kruszyn, Kruszyna, or Kruszyny. These place names are probably from Polish dialect krusza 'pear tree' or from a derivative of kruszyc 'to crumble', 'fragment', or from a derivative of kruch 'block', 'lump'."

This may have well referred to the cross (tree/stake) as "de la Cruz" did; "kruch" could refer to the firstfruits or a special part of the matzah or lechem reserved for kohanim; or, in the case of "block", the cornerstone of the Temple. Anusim and Jews otherwise were clever like that.

Reply    Quote
Nickidewbear  Photos: 3  ♀Yesterday, 04:25am  #

Jewish Records Indexing - Poland

Jewish Records Indexing - Poland, Inc. is an independent non-profit tax exempt organization under section
501(c)(3) of the U.S. Internal Revenue Code. Contributions are tax-deductible in the U.S.A.
JRI-Poland is hosted by JewishGen.

Run on Tuesday 4 February 2014 at 20:24:48

Searching for Surname (phonetically like) KRUSZYNSKI
in Suwalki Gubernia
in ALL data

Bakalarzewo Births 1826-33,39-43,52-64,66,67,70-75,77-79,83
Marriages 1827-30,32-37,39-43,52-64,66,67,70-75,77-79,83
Deaths 1826-37,39-43,52-64,66,67,70-75,77-79,83
Suwalki Gubernia / Bialystok Province
Located at 54°06' 22°39'
Last updated December 2006

Surname Given Name Year Type Akta Father Father Surname Mother Mother Surname Mother's Father Microfilm
GUMBINER Szmojl/o 1840 M 3 Nisiel Asna Aronowna 746,481
KRUSZYN'SKA Dweura 1840 M 3 Hyrsz Enia 746,481
Suwalki Births 1827-28,30,32-40,42-51,53-54,56-67,69,72,73,75, 78-79,81-85
Marriages 1826-30,32,34-40,42-51,53-54,56-67,69,72,75,78-79,81-85
Deaths 1827-30,32,34-40,42-51,53-54,56-67,69,72,73,75, 78-79,81-85
Suwalki Gubernia / Bialystok Province
Located at 54°06' 22°56'
Last updated December 2006

Surname Given Name Year Type Akta Father Father Surname Mother Mother Surname Mother's Father Microfilm Comments
KRUCIN'SKI Mowsza Beniamin 1843 B 34 Abram Chaszka Rochla Hirszowna 752,620
KRUCIN'SKA Raszka 1845 B 18 Abram Rocha Hirszowna 752,620
KRUSIN'SKA Rywka 1850 B 54 Abram Chaszka Rocha Hirszowna 752,621
KRUSIN'SKI Mowsza Zyskind 1857 B 61 Elko Leja Berkowna 752,622
KRUSIN'SKI Lejba 1858 B 11 Abram Rejzla GLASLENDER 752,622
KRUSIN'SKA Rocha 1858 B 12 Abram Rejzla GLASLENDER 752,622
FLAXBYNDER Dawid Berko 1859 B 113 Chaim Peszka Gitla KRUSIN'SKA 752,622
KRUCIN'SKA Itka 1859 B 182 Lejba Dyna Liba Jechielowna 752,622
KRUSZYN'SKI Fiszko Berko 1859 B 203 Abram Rejza GLASLENDER 752,622
KRUSIN'SKI Jankiel Hirsz 1860 B 227 Elko Leja Berkowna 752,622
KRUCIN'SKI Dawid Szloma 1860 B 255 Hirsz Rejza Hirszowna 752,622
KRUCIN'SKI Wolf 1861 B 59 Lejba Dyna Liba Jechielowna 752,622
KANOWSKA Mal/ka 1861 B 163 Naftel Etka KRUCIN'SKA 752,622
KRUSIN'SKA Gisza 1862 B 25 Abram Rejza GLASLENDER 752,623
KANOWSKI Chackiel 1862 B 310 Nawtel Etka KRUCIN'SKA 752,623
KRUCIN'SKI Efroim 1867 B 2 Lejba Dyna Liba MARIAMPOLSKA 1,199,520
WYL/KOWIN'SKI Dawid 1872 B 163 Szmerko Necha KRUCIN'SKA 1,199,520
KRUSIN'SKA Chaja Rywka 1878 B 101 Lejba Sora Leja KORKLIN'SKA 1,496,954
JELENIEWSKA Rywka 1878 B 104 Mortchaj Gisza KRUSIN'SKA 1,496,954
JELENIEWSKA Chana 1878 B 105 Mortchaj Gisza KRUSIN'SKA 1,496,954
KRUCIN'SKA Gitla 1878 B 135 Tewia Chasza Rona BIRGER 1,496,954
KRUSIN'SKI Cal/ko Kal/man 1878 B 492 Lejba Sora Leja KARLIN'SKA 1,496,954
GRABOWSKA Chasza Rochla 1881 B 85 Josel Rywa KRUSZYN'SKA 1,496,954
GRABOWSKI Cal/ko 1881 B 86 Josel Rywa KRUSZYN'SKA 1,496,954
GRABOWSKI Elko 1881 B 87 Josel Rywa KRUSZYN'SKA 1,496,954
KRUSIN'SKI Mowsza Beniamin 1847 D 47 Abram Chaszka Rocha Hirszowna 752,620
KRUSIN'SKI Josiel Hirsz 1848 D 78 Abram Chaszka Rochla Hirszowna 752,621
KRUCIN'SKI Ajzyk 1856 D 51 Lejba Dyna Liba Jechielowna 752,622
KRUCIN'SKA Chaja Szpryntza 1864 D 80 Lejba Dyna Liba Jochelowna 752,623
KRUCIN'SKI Wo'lf 1865 D 70 Lejba Dyna Liba STAROPOLSKA 752,623
KRUCIN'SKI Icko 1867 D 59 Berek Frejga Frejda Nowachowna 1,199,520
KRUCIN'SKI Mowsza 1869 D 18 Berek Etka 1,199,520
JELENIEWSKI Beniamin Eliasz 1872 D 140 Mortchaj Gisza KRUSZYN'SKA 1,199,520
KRUSZYN'SKI Abram 1881 D 87 Berek Rochla 1,496,954
KRUCIN'SKA Sora 1885 D 95 Chackiel NERENSZTEJN Chiena 1,496,955
KRUSIN'SKI Elko 1844 M 28 Berko Rocha Josielowna 752,620
L/OPACIN'SKA Leja 1844 M 28 Berko Chana Jankielowna 752,620
PREJS Baszka 1849 M 18 Tobiasz Fejga Mendelowna 752,621
KRUCIN'SKI Chackiel 1849 M 18 Idzk Mal/ka Zyskindowna 752,621
JELENIEWSKI Morthaj 1849 M 37 Mowszo Chaja Eliaszowna 752,621
KRUSZYN'SKA Gisza 1849 M 37 Berek Rochla Josielowna 752,621
KANOWSKI Naftel 1860 M 2 Chaim Szejna Jankielowna 752,622
KRUCIN'SKA Etka 1860 M 2 Abram Frejda Josielowna 752,622
AMDURSKA Gitla 1867 M 23 Gierszon Chana BLUMENTHAL 1,199,520
KRUCIN'SKI Josiel 1867 M 23 Abram Frejda Josielowna 1,199,520
GRABOWSKI Josel 1881 M 22 Wolf Gita 1,496,954
KRUSZYN'SKA Ryfka 1881 M 22 Abram Chasza Rochla 1,496,954
KRUSZYN'SKI Fiszko Berko 1883 M 31 Abram Rejzla 1,496,955
KIRSZTEJN Basia Bluma 1883 M 31 Szlema Chaja Sora 1,496,955
KRUSIN'SKI Jankiel Hersz 1864 B 34 Elko Leja Berkowna 752,623
KRUSIN'SKA Gisza 1864 B 35 Elko Leja Berkowna 752,623
KRUCIN'SKA Chawa 1864 B 91 Hirsz Rejza Hirszowna 752,623
KRUCIN'SKA Merka 1864 B 92 Hirsz Rejza Hirszowna 752,623
KRUCIN'SKA Chana 1865 B 285 Lejba Dyna Liba STAROPOLSKA 752,623
KRUSIN'SKI Jankiel 1865 B 416 Abram Rejza GLASLENDER 752,623
Suwalki PSA Births, Marriages 1887,88,91-94,96 Deaths 1829,41,87,88,91-94,96
Suwalki Gubernia / Bialystok Province
(records in Fond 204 in Suwalki Archive)
Located at 54°06' 22°56'
Last updated March 2002

Surname Given Name Year Type Akta
KRUCINSKI Icko 1888 B 144
KRUCINSKI Szmul Lejb 1888 B 145
KRUCINSKI Chackel 1887 D 77
KRUSZYNSKA Mera 1888 D 29
KRUCINSKI Abram 1888 D 54
KRUSINSKI Szepszel Jankel 1896 D 24
Wizajny Births, Marriages, Deaths 1829-30,32-38,40-42,44-48,51-53,55-69,73-74,77,79-80
Suwalki Gubernia / Bialystok Province
Located at 54°22' 22°51'
Last updated December 2006

Surname Given Name Year Type Akta Father Father Surname Mother Mother Surname Mother's Father Microfilm
KRUCIN'SKI Lejba 1845 M 5 Jankiel Sprynca 752,654
MARIAMPOLSKA Dynka 1845 M 5 Jochel Chana 752,654


I'm thinking that an apology is in order.

Reply    Quote
Magdalena  Photos: 1  ♀Yesterday, 10:09am     #

Nickidewbear:
I'm thinking that an apology is in order.


An apology for what exactly? For the fact that a surname is being used by both Jews and Gentiles? :-)
Of course Jews used many Polish names, they lived amongst Poles after all; but while I can list genealogical records showing these surnames were used by gentile Poles, and you can do the same for the Jews, there is still no hard evidence one way or the other, it seems. That's all I am saying. I'm not saying some of your ancestors were not Jewish, I'm just saying it's not really evident from the info in this thread.

Nickidewbear:
According to Ancestry.com, "Polish (Kruszynski): habitational name for someone from any of various places called Kruszyn, Kruszyna, or Kruszyny. These place names are probably from Polish dialect krusza 'pear tree' or from a derivative of kruszyc 'to crumble', 'fragment', or from a derivative of kruch 'block', 'lump'."

This may have well referred to the cross (tree/stake) as "de la Cruz" did; "kruch" could refer to the firstfruits or a special part of the matzah or lechem reserved for kohanim; or, in the case of "block", the cornerstone of the Temple. Anusim and Jews otherwise were clever like that.


With this type of reasoning, you could probably take any random surname from anywhere in the world and claim it is of Jewish origin. It would be much more realistic, I think, to accept that at least part of your ancestors were Polish gentiles. At least looking at the marriage certificate I translated, it sure seems that way.

Reply    Quote
Harry   ♂Yesterday, 11:40am     #

Nickidewbear:
 why would they fall out with their son if they were Catholic, since he and his wife converted to Catholicism? Also, they didn't fall out until after Great-Granddad was born.

There are literally a million reasons. Maybe he forgot his mother's birthday, maybe he cheated his father while playing cards, maybe his wife hated his mother. We simply don't know. But what we can say is that it is highly unlikely that they fell out with their son when he converted to Catholicism, given that the documentation we have shows them as being married as Catholics themselves.

Nickidewbear:
why would he have to lie so much on his naturalization, etc. documents?

Again, there are literally a million reasons. Maybe he was on the run after robbing a bank, maybe he'd always hated the name Daniel (or whatever), maybe the immigration officer wrote his name down wrong and he thought it would just be easier to use his new 'American' name on the documents, maybe he didn't lie at all and you're just looking at the documents wrong. We simply don't know. But what we can say is that it is highly unlikely that he was lying as a result of converting to Catholicism, given that the documentation we have shows his parents as being married as Catholics themselves.

Nickidewbear:
She would not have married a Catholic.

Interesting you say that. What basis do you have for saying that she wouldn't have married a Catholic, given that the documentation we have shows her as being married in a Catholic church as a Catholic.

Nickidewbear:
Yes, but Catholics could marry for love. Jews weren't allowed to do so in the Old Country.

It never ceases to amaze me that somebody can have read so much about Jews but know so little about them.

Magdalena:
 It would be much more realistic, I think, to accept that at least part of your ancestors were Polish gentiles.

But that's not the reality Nickie wants.

Reply    Quote
Nickidewbear  Photos: 3  ♀Yesterday, 04:30pm  #

Magdalena:
An apology for what exactly? For the fact that a surname is being used by both Jews and Gentiles? :-)
Of course Jews used many Polish names, they lived amongst Poles after all; but while I can list genealogical records showing these surnames were used by gentile Poles, and you can do the same for the Jews, there is still no hard evidence one way or the other, it seems. That's all I am saying. I'm not saying some of your ancestors were not Jewish, I'm just saying it's not really evident from the info in this thread.


All I'm saying is that their being married Catholic or even them being Catholic does not exclude their being Jewish. Jewishness is ethnic and/or religious. One does not exclude the other.

Nickidewbear:According to Ancestry.com, "Polish (Kruszynski): habitational name for someone from any of various places called Kruszyn, Kruszyna, or Kruszyny. These place names are probably from Polish dialect krusza 'pear tree' or from a derivative of kruszyc 'to crumble', 'fragment', or from a derivative of kruch 'block', 'lump'."

This may have well referred to the cross (tree/stake) as "de la Cruz" did; "kruch" could refer to the firstfruits or a special part of the matzah or lechem reserved for kohanim; or, in the case of "block", the cornerstone of the Temple. Anusim and Jews otherwise were clever like that.

With this type of reasoning, you could probably take any random surname from anywhere in the world and claim it is of Jewish origin. It would be much more realistic, I think, to accept that at least part of your ancestors were Polish gentiles. At least looking at the marriage certificate I translated, it sure seems that way.


Well, there are still many "lost" Jews, as Shavei Israel calls many Anusim and bnei-Anusim. Also, in Ezekiel 44, for example, it reads:

28 "It shall be, in regard to their inheritance, that I am their inheritance. You shall give them no possession in Israel, for I am their possession. 29 They shall eat the grain offering, the sin offering, and the trespass offering; every dedicated thing in Israel shall be theirs. 30 The best of all firstfruits of any kind, and every sacrifice of any kind from all your sacrifices, shall be the priest's; also you shall give to the priest the first of your ground meal, to cause a blessing to rest on your house. 31 The priests shall not eat anything, bird or beast, that died naturally or was torn by wild beasts.


In another translation, it reads,

28 "'Their inheritance is to be this: I myself am their inheritance. You are not to grant them any possession in Isra'el - I myself am their possession. 29 They are to eat the grain offerings, sin offerings and guilt offerings; and everything in Isra'el devoted [to God] will be theirs. 30 The first of all the firstfruits of everything, and every voluntary contribution of everything, from all your offerings, will be for the cohanim. You are also to give the cohen the first of your dough, so that a blessing will rest on your house. 31 The cohanim are not to eat anything, bird or animal, that dies naturally or is torn to death.


"The first of your dough" could refer to a lump of dough, going back to the meaning of "lump". See, e.g., Genealoj.

Reply    Quote
Nickidewbear  Photos: 3  ♀Edited by: Nickidewbear  Yesterday, 04:41pm  #

Harry:

Nickidewbear: why would they fall out with their son if they were Catholic, since he and his wife converted to Catholicism? Also, they didn't fall out until after Great-Granddad was born.
There are literally a million reasons. Maybe he forgot his mother's birthday, maybe he cheated his father while playing cards, maybe his wife hated his mother. We simply don't know. But what we can say is that it is highly unlikely that they fell out with their son when he converted to Catholicism, given that the documentation we have shows them as being married as Catholics themselves.


You want cut-and-dry realities. It doesn't work that way. Sometimes, Jews even witnessed baptisms.

Nickidewbear:why would he have to lie so much on his naturalization, etc. documents?
Again, there are literally a million reasons. Maybe he was on the run after robbing a bank, maybe he'd always hated the name Daniel (or whatever), maybe the immigration officer wrote his name down wrong and he thought it would just be easier to use his new 'American' name on the documents, maybe he didn't lie at all and you're just looking at the documents wrong. We simply don't know. But what we can say is that it is highly unlikely that he was lying as a result of converting to Catholicism, given that the documentation we have shows his parents as being married as Catholics themselves.



If he robbed a bank, he would've been extradited and/or deported from the U.S..

Nickidewbear:She would not have married a Catholic.
Interesting you say that. What basis do you have for saying that she wouldn't have married a Catholic, given that the documentation we have shows her as being married in a Catholic church as a Catholic.



She (Alexandria) was an Orthodox Jew. Learn to read.

Nickidewbear:Yes, but Catholics could marry for love. Jews weren't allowed to do so in the Old Country.
It never ceases to amaze me that somebody can have read so much about Jews but know so little about them.



We weren't. You either did shidduch or you didn't marry. Marrying for love in Orthodox Judaism was avodah zarah"idolizing" romantic love over kiddushin.

Magdalena: It would be much more realistic, I think, to accept that at least part of your ancestors were Polish gentiles.
But that's not the reality Nickie wants.


You don't want reality, Harry. What you want is reality to fit your mold. It doesn't. Again, it isn't cut and dry.

Reply    Quote
Harry   ♂Yesterday, 05:00pm     #

Nickidewbear:
You want cut-and-dry realities. It doesn't work that way. Sometimes, Jews even witnessed baptisms.

The reality is that when a couple get married by a Catholic priest, at least one of them is a Catholic. Back then almost always both of them were. And back then, a non-Catholic partner had to promise during the wedding that their children would be brought up as Catholics, meaning that their son could not have converted to Catholicism: he would have been brought up as a Catholic.

Nickidewbear:
If he robbed a bank, he would've been extradited and/or deported from the U.S..

Which is precisely why he would want to lie about his name (and quite possibly other details about his past). Maybe he lied to conceal his Jewish past (the one which involved being brought up as a Catholic), maybe he lied for a million other reasons, maybe he actually told the truth: you simply do not know (although you can be pretty sure that as he was brought up as a Catholic, having a Jewish past most probably isn't the reason).

Nickidewbear:
She (Alexandria) was an Orthodox Jew. Learn to read.

An orthodox Jew who married a Catholic would be shunned by the community.

Nickidewbear:
 You either did shidduch or you didn't marry. Marrying for love in Orthodox Judaism was avodah zarah,

Since when were all Jews Orthodox?

Nickidewbear:
You don't want reality, Harry. What you want is reality to fit your mold. It doesn't. Again, it isn't cut and dry.

Frankly Nickie, I couldn't care less whether your ancestors were Jews, Catholics, Zulus, shape-shifting aliens from the planet Tharg, whatever. What I would like is for you to get better, for you to be happier, and I really do not think that you obsessing about a past where for many generations your father's family have engaged in a conspiracy to hide the truth from you is doing you any good at all.

Reply    Quote
Nickidewbear  Photos: 3  ♀Yesterday, 05:39pm  #

Harry:

Nickidewbear:You want cut-and-dry realities. It doesn't work that way. Sometimes, Jews even witnessed baptisms.
The reality is that when a couple get married by a Catholic priest, at least one of them is a Catholic. Back then almost always both of them were. And back then, a non-Catholic partner had to promise during the wedding that their children would be brought up as Catholics, meaning that their son could not have converted to Catholicism: he would have been brought up as a Catholic.


That doesn't mean that they kept those promises. Also, again, Maćkowa was small enough not to have a chief "rabbi".


Nickidewbear:If he robbed a bank, he would've been extradited and/or deported from the U.S..
Which is precisely why he would want to lie about his name (and quite possibly other details about his past). Maybe he lied to conceal his Jewish past (the one which involved being brought up as a Catholic), maybe he lied for a million other reasons, maybe he actually told the truth: you simply do not know (although you can be pretty sure that as he was brought up as a Catholic, having a Jewish past most probably isn't the reason).


Poland and Russia would have demanded him back had he stolen anything from a bank. The law was stricter back then. Also,

Nickidewbear:She (Alexandria) was an Orthodox Jew. Learn to read.
An orthodox Jew who married a Catholic would be shunned by the community.


That's the point. They were Jews when they married. Granduncle Tony explicitly wrote:

my emphasis (bold):
Periodically a church pastor would run a heritage trip back to Poland for a group. Very few of those who immigrated would return. Occasionally someone "in the family" in America would join a relative for the return trip, Usually meeting the Polish or Slovak relatives for the first time and occasionally maintaining a letter writing relationship afterwards. This DID NOT happen in our family.

There was not very much correspondence with the Polish family. Only an infrequent letter. There were no exchanges other than through the Polish Church which would have clothing drives and send clothes to Poland in general, but not to specific family members. Bertha's photos which came after the trips were the only contact until they asked for the deed to be changed in the mid 1960's.


They were shunned.


Nickidewbear: You either did shidduch or you didn't marry. Marrying for love in Orthodox Judaism was avodah zarah,
Since when were all Jews Orthodox?


You were either Orthodox, Karaite, or "meshumad". Reform (Neolog), Conservative (Masorti), and other denominations of Judaism were not founded until the 18th-20th Centuries.

Nickidewbear:You don't want reality, Harry. What you want is reality to fit your mold. It doesn't. Again, it isn't cut and dry.
Frankly Nickie, I couldn't care less whether your ancestors were Jews, Catholics, Zulus, shape-shifting aliens from the planet Tharg, whatever. What I would like is for you to get better, for you to be happier, and I really do not think that you obsessing about a past where for many generations your father's family have engaged in a conspiracy to hide the truth from you is doing you any good at all.


I never said that it was a conspiracy, and I could get you prosecuted for criminal libel for suggesting that I have a mental illness. What I said is that they deliberately hid and lied about our past. I didn't say for conspiratorial reasons, though I did say that it was wrong. Again, you want cut-and-dry reality. Especially for Anusim, it doesn't work that way. Fine case-in-point example:

It is difficult to generalize about all descendants of conversos. Naturally, no "*marrano" Judaism existed in the Peninsula. Various customs and different prayers developed among different groups. In certain areas, however, a very strong "Jewish" identity remained until almost modern times. That is why we have recently witnessed the return of many Crypto-Jews in Belmonte, in northern Portugal, to Judaism and why so many descendants of conversos left Spain and Portugal and joined existing Jewish communities or formed their own after their return to normative Judaism.


Also, a kohein recently found out that he is a kohein:

Aoflko's mother told him that she and his father were Polish Jews whose families perished in the Auschwitz concentration camp. Fearing post-war anti-Semitism in Poland, they decided to hide their identities and pass themselves off as Catholics.


Getting married in a shul, say, in Krasnopol or Sejny may have subjected them to persecution, etc.. For example, they could've been murdered on the way home:

ANUSIM (Heb. אֲנוּסִים; "forced ones"), persons compelled by overwhelming pressure, whether by physical threats, psychological stress, or economic sanctions, to abjure Judaism and adopt a different faith.


Also,

The community hesitated for three days before making a decision. Finally the majority, some 500, accepted Christianity. The Christians in Clermont greeted the event with rejoicing: "Candles were lit, the lamps shone, the whole city radiated with the light of the snow-white flock" (i.e., the forced converts). The Jews who preferred exile left for *Marseilles (Gregory of Tours, Histories, 5:11) The poet Venantius Fortunatus composed a poem to commemorate the occasion. In 582 the Frankish king Chilperic compelled numerous Jews to adopt Christianity. Again the anusim were not wholehearted in their conversion, for "some of them, cleansed in body but not in heart, denied God, and returned to their ancient perfidy, so that they were seen keeping the Sabbath, as well as Sunday" (ibid., 6:17).


Not everyone could handle the "physical threats, psychological stress, or economic sanctions," especially in a small town where their Jewishness and Judaism would stick out like a sore thumb.






Ashkenazim were well aware of what their Sefardi brothers and sisters went through. In fact, many Ashkenazim are descended from Sefardim who fled Sefarad.

Reply    Quote
Nickidewbear  Photos: 3  ♀Yesterday, 11:23pm  #

Harry:
Nickidewbear:That doesn't mean that they kept those promises.
But the balance of probabilities is that they did. Just as the balance of probabilities is that their son did not convert to Catholicism but was actually brought up a Catholic.

Nickidewbear:Also, again, Maćkowa was small enough not to have a chief "rabbi".
a) Says who?
b) What was stopping them getting one in for a planned event?
c) You really think that they thought 'Sod getting a rabbi in for the wedding, we'll just get the Catholic priest to do it'? Really?


a) Small towns didn't have chiefs "rabbis".
b) Did you not read about Anusim?
c) Yes. In fact, a set of great-great-great-great grandparents converted to Catholicism to marry and avoid Anti Semitism. They lived the rest of their lives in a small town where there were only three open Jews in 1887.

Nickidewbear:Poland and Russia would have demanded him back had he stolen anything from a bank. The law was stricter back then.
a) No they wouldn't: they couldn't, there was no extradition treaty for bank robbery between the USA and Russia back then.
b) They wouldn't have known he was there if he lied about his name.



They would've looked for him. Also, Russians hated Poles and Jews, and they did "Jew hunts" for no good reason all of the time.

Nickidewbear:You were either Orthodox, Karaite, or "meshumad". Reform (Neolog), Conservative (Masorti), and other denominations of Judaism were not founded until the 18th-20th Centuries.
This wedding was in 1840, so 140 years after you say other denominations of Judaism were first founded.



a) Reform Judaism didn't take off until the Middle 1800s in Western Europe, and it rarely happened in Slovakia, etc.; and it rarely, if it all, happened in the Russian Empire, the hotbed of Lubavitchi Judaism.
b) Conservative Judaism broke from Reform Judaism.
c) Reconstructionist Judaism was founded around 1920, when Mordechai Kaplan broke with both Orthodox and Conservative Judaism.

Nickidewbear: I could get you prosecuted for criminal libel for suggesting that I have a mental illness.
a) No I didn't say that.
b) No you can't.
c) Even if I had and you could, as Jon, points out, you've posted certain information both here and elsewhere.



a) You implied it.

b) Having OCD/Anxiety, Depression, and ADD is way different than having, e.g., delusional paranoia.

c) I can share my own information; thank you.

I accepted that the certificate is theirs once it was translated, and I was able to catch nuances in it.

Please keep your thread on topic, thank you

Reply    Quote
Nickidewbear  Photos: 3  ♀Edited by: Nickidewbear  Today, 01:18am  #

Mod's comment:

Please keep your thread on topic, thank you


I was; I just had a legitimate question: "Why would they fall out with their son if they were Catholic, since he and his wife converted to Catholicism? Also, they didn't fall out until after Great-Granddad was born. Furthermore, why would he have to lie so much on his naturalization, etc. documents?" To be honest, I think that someone is mistaken or lying: either Google Translate is or Magdalena is, or Maciej found a document with the same names that Great-Great-Granddad gave but with people who different people. I can't tell who. Also, that they married Catholic doesn't preclude them from being Jewish if they are the right people.

The translation that Google came up with is, ""I think that so even sure these are not Catholics but only so much I found :)" for ""Mysle ze tak a nawet napewno to sa katolicy no ale tylko tyle znalazlem:)". I also typed "no" in for Polish and got the following in English:

well
No!-interjection
Well!
No!, Więc!, Ano!, Ale!, Aha!, He!



I just want to make sure that I'm getting an honest translation. Also, when I talked to someone else about whether "priest" could be "rabbi", he said:

Hi,
ks. W. Olszewski e.g. Wojciech Olszewski was the catholic priest of parish Wigry till 9th June 1875.

So he couldn't be rabbi.

http://wigry.diecezja.elk.pl/historia-parafii/historia-w-latach-1 800-1946.html?start=4

I've never seen such certificate till now, but seems to me peculiar that although it was the religious marriage there are nothing about the groom and bride were Catholic or not.
But maybe it was something obvious for the priest and he didn't mention this.

[I had asked:]
When the certificate says, "priest", does it mean "rabbi" perchance? From what a cousin told me, this was a Non-Catholic certificate.


Why would they not mention if the parents were Catholic, too? Also, banns being a week apart fits well into line with openly-Jewish and Anusi practice. That's all that I'm saying.

Reply    Quote
pam   ♀ ModeratorToday, 01:28am  #

Nickidewbear:
To be honest, I think that someone is mistaken or lying: either Google Translate is or Magdalena is,


Google translate is not that reliable. At all.
Why would Magdalena lie? She translated that certificate, she was trying to help you.

Nickidewbear:
 ""Mysle ze tak a nawet napewno to sa katolicy no ale tylko tyle znalazlem:)"


The translation Magdalena gave for this sentence is correct.

Reply    Quote
Nickidewbear  Photos: 3  ♀Today, 01:41am  #

pam:

Nickidewbear:To be honest, I think that someone is mistaken or lying: either Google Translate is or Magdalena is,

Google translate is not that reliable. At all.
Why would Magdalena lie? She translated that certificate, she was trying to help you.


She, Harry, and Jon have had problems with that my family history doesn't fit the mold for how a Jew's history normally fits. So, she could be lying to me in order to affect me to think something different, since she is fluent in Polish and I have no clue what is being said. So, she could be trying to dupe me. And anyway, I asked the mod.

Nickidewbear: ""Mysle ze tak a nawet napewno to sa katolicy no ale tylko tyle znalazlem:)"

The translation Magdalena gave for this sentence is correct.


How do I know? And Google Translate is not perfect but is reliable for the basics. Also, you conveniently dodged the point of when I talked to someone else about whether "priest" could be "rabbi". He stated point blankly, "I've never seen such certificate till now, but seems to me peculiar that although it was the religious marriage there are nothing about the groom and bride were Catholic or not. But maybe it was something obvious for the priest and he didn't mention this."

I know that in Hungarian Slovakia, a set of great-great-great-great-grandparents who were Catholic had to be "acquitted" to marry because they were ethnic Jews whose conversion the priest highly doubted (since they really were Anusim and not genuine converts). My cousin, who would loved if that side wasn't Jewish, told me that the Hungarian word meant "acquitted", and he's a pretty-honest guy-he wasn't happy at all that he had to concede that I figured out what happened on that side.

[Page 2]


pam   ♀ ModeratorToday, 01:49am  #

Nickidewbear:
she could be lying to me in order to affect me to think something different, since she is fluent in Polish and I have no clue what is being said.


What she wrote was truthful.
I understand Polish well enough to confirm this, and I don't have any reason to lie to you whatsoever.

Nickidewbear:
 And Google Translate is not perfect but is reliable for the basics.


Not by a long shot it isn't. We wouldn't have so many posters asking questions about Polish language if Google translate was that reliable.

Nickidewbear:
 Also, you conveniently dodged the point of when I talked to someone else about whether "priest" could be "rabbi".


I'm not trying to dodge anything. The only reason I commented was to confirm that Magdalena was correct in her translation, nothing more.


Reply    Quote
Nickidewbear  Photos: 3  ♀Today, 01:58am  #

pam:

Nickidewbear:she could be lying to me in order to affect me to think something different, since she is fluent in Polish and I have no clue what is being said.

What she wrote was truthful.
I understand Polish well enough to confirm this, and I don't have any reason to lie to you whatsoever.


I'm not saying that you do. I'm saying that she might.

Nickidewbear: And Google Translate is not perfect but is reliable for the basics.

Not by a long shot it isn't. We wouldn't have so many posters asking questions about Polish language if Google translate was that reliable.


Then why do I get so many hits saying that is reliable for the basic gist?

Nickidewbear: Also, you conveniently dodged the point of when I talked to someone else about whether "priest" could be "rabbi".

I'm not trying to dodge anything. The only reason I commented was to confirm that Magdalena was correct in her translation, nothing more.


That's an important point, though. A native Polophone who I trust says that he's never seen a certificate like that for Catholics.

Reply    Quote
Vincent   ♂ ModeratorToday, 02:05am  #

Nickidewbear:
I think that someone is mistaken or lying: either Google Translate is or Magdalena is


Nickidewbear you seem very ungrateful, asking for a translation then calling the translator a liar.

Nickidewbear:
So, she could be lying to me in order to affect me to think something different, since she is fluent in Polish and I have no clue what is being said. So, she could be trying to dupe me.


She's a bit more than fluent as I believe she's a professional translator/interpreter and would have no reason to lie to you. Most people would be very grateful that she has given up her time to help them.

Reply    Quote
pam   ♀ ModeratorToday, 02:08am  #

Nickidewbear:
I'm not saying that you do. I'm saying that she might.


She was kind enough to translate that marriage certificate for you when she didn't have to.
I find it hard to understand that you think she would then lie about that sentence. To what end?
And the sentence is correct whatever you might think.

Nickidewbear:
Then why do I get so many hits saying that is reliable for the basic gist?


I use it for translation of a few words here and there.
When it comes to sentences, in my opinion it's more often wrong than right.

Reply    Quote
Nickidewbear  Photos: 3  ♀Today, 03:34am  #

Vincent:

Nickidewbear:I think that someone is mistaken or lying: either Google Translate is or Magdalena is

Nickidewbear you seem very ungrateful, asking for a translation then calling the translator a liar.


Conveniently, you omitted the part where I said that she could be fooling me because she speaks the language and I don't. If I wanted to lie to someone who is not fluent in English, I could. But I wouldn't.

Nickidewbear:So, she could be lying to me in order to affect me to think something different, since she is fluent in Polish and I have no clue what is being said. So, she could be trying to dupe me.

She's a bit more than fluent as I believe she's a professional translator/interpreter and would have no reason to lie to you. Most people would be very grateful that she has given up her time to help them.


She would. More than numerous times, she has said that those with Polish names and Catholics can't be Jews, much less passers or Anusim. I also said, "Ok. Thanks." and brought up a legitimate question. I don't just accept things at face value. If that's the kind of person that she and you want, then that's certainly not what you're getting from me.

Reply    Quote
Nickidewbear  Photos: 3  ♀Today, 03:50am  #

pam:

Nickidewbear:I'm not saying that you do. I'm saying that she might.


She was kind enough to translate that marriage certificate for you when she didn't have to.
I find it hard to understand that you think she would then lie about that sentence. To what end?
And the sentence is correct whatever you might think.


And how do I know? She's not one of these people that I can exactly trust. I had a legitimate question, and she dodged with, "they could have quarrelled with their son for any number of reasons, don't you think? and how could he convert to Catholicism if he was clearly born to Catholic parents? as to naturalisation documents, they were filled out by Ellis Island officials who wrote down whatever they thought they heard the immigrants say, or just wrote down what they thought was right, esp. regarding names and surnames. many immigrants were illiterate or half illiterate, so they then made further spelling mistakes in their names as time went on."

If he was born Catholic, why did he marry a Jew? Also, why did he fall out with his parents for converting? Why did his son and grandson marry Jews? Why does Dad's atDNA show Middle Eastern ("Caucaus" and West Asian) DNA? Besides, in Poland, you either intramarried, converted, or were excommunicated.

Nickidewbear:Then why do I get so many hits saying that is reliable for the basic gist?



I use it for translation of a few words here and there.
When it comes to sentences, in my opinion it's more often wrong than right.


Your opinion seems to contradict with the evidence, though; and then I get the rapsheet when I bring up evidence that points to something? I'm sorry for you that I'm not the mold-fitting Jew; and if something seems questionable and agenda pushed, I'm going to bring it up.

Reply    Quote
TheOther   ♂Today, 03:51am     #

Nickidewbear:
I don't just accept things at face value.

You will always hit a brick wall in your research unless you at least consider the possibility that you and your family are NOT Jewish. Got no documents, got no proof - that's how genealogy works. But I told you that already back in 2009 or so...

Reply    Quote
Nickidewbear  Photos: 3  ♀Edited by: Nickidewbear  Today, 04:15am  #

TheOther:
You will always hit a brick wall in your research unless you at least consider the possibility that you and your family are NOT Jewish. Got no documents, got no proof - that's how genealogy works. But I told you that already back in 2009 or so...


I actually do have documents, some of which I found myself and some of which others found for me. Besides, in those days, you converted "up" and not "down" unless you wanted to face severe persecution. Let's look at the Andruleviches, for example: some Anusim, some open Jews. If you don't believe me, you can go look them up yourself. Also, one (e.g., being married Catholic) does not preclude the other (e.g., being ethnically Jewish):

JewishGen Lithuania Database:

Run on Wednesday 5 February 2014 at 19:55:50

Surname Given Name Father Occupation
Address
Telephone # Year Page # Comments Town
Uyezd
Gubernia Publication Type
ANDRELOVICH Nik

Dvortsovaya Street, 4
1915 7
Vilnius
Vilnius
Vilnius Vsia Vilna (City Direc


JewishGen Ukraine Database:

Searching for Surname (phonetically like) Andrulevich
Number of hits: 1
Run on Wednesday 5 February 2014 at 19:57:46

Name Patronymic Year /
Number Qualifications Town (type)
Street Uyezd
District Age
Nationality

ANDRULEVICH, Vil'gel'm Ser. 1906 / 56 Po promysl.nalogu Buzhanka (s.)
Zvenigorodka



Name: Rochla Andrelewitz
Arrival Date: 2 Sep 1907
Birth Date: abt 1885
Birth Location Other: Wilna
Age: 22
Gender: Female
Ethnicity/ Nationality: Hebrew
Port of Departure: Antwerp, Belgium
Port of Arrival: New York, New York
Ship Name: Kroonland


By the way, a Jewish Danilovich named Anton (as if Jews can't have Polish names):

JewishGen Lithuania Database:

DANILOVICH, Anton

Polnaya Street
Kalvarija Kalvarija
Suwalki Street Directory - Home Owners
1908 


Again, it's not all cut and dry. Jews can be Catholics, and vice versa. My branch became Jewish Catholics for whatever reason. I may not be the smartest person, but I'm not stupid. Also, I didn't wake up one morning and decide, "Hmmm. I'm going to make up this ******** story." I didn't even know that Great-Granddad's parents came over here. By the way, "he spoke perfect English" (as my granduncle Tony said) and my great-great-granddad conveniently did not remember what ship he was on, gave 3-4 different birth years, lied about most of his kids' birthdates (either that; or they all lied), and gave both May and November as his immigration dates. He could also write.

On his draft card, he gave 1877. 

Pretty sloppy for someone who didn't want to lie.

Also, this record made the June 26th date check out for Great-Great-Grandma:

JewishGen Lithuania database:

Searching for Surname (phonetically like) Morgovich
Number of hits: 1
Run on Wednesday 5 February 2014 at 20:14:44

Name Father
Mother
Spouse Residence
Comments Date of Death
DD/MM/YY
Hebrew Date
Age
Cause of Death Town
Uyezd
Guberniya Place Recorded
Year
Record # Microfilm
Item
Image
Archive / Fond

MORGOVICH, Shmuil Movsha
- -
- - Merech [Merkine]
- 4/4/1882
15 Nisan 5642
20
tuberculosis Stakliskes
Trakai
Vilnius Stakliskes, Aukstadvaris rabbinate
1882
M4 2205094
3
1024
LVIA/9858


Had that record not come up, I would have continued to question Great-Great-Grandma's birthdate. I would have no reason to lie about what my family did.

  • Here, his wife gives 1879. Quite convenient when he gave 1876 and 1877.
    Here, his wife gives 1879. Quite convenient when he gave 1876 and 1877.